Menu header Billetterie en

Global menu

  • June 1, 2020

Planets visible to the naked eye - June 1, 2020

  • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
Photo: Sophie Desrosiers
Planets visible to the naked eye

From June 1 to 15, 2020

Mercury is undergoing a favourable evening apparition until mid-June. Look for the tiny planet low on the west-northwest horizon, 30 minutes after sunset: Binoculars will help you locate this tiny dot of light against the colours of sunset.

Venus passes between Earth and the Sun (inferior conjunction) on June 3, and then gradually reappears at dawn. Starting in mid-June, we’ll be able to see it very low in the east-northeast, about 30 minutes before sunrise. Binoculars will help you locate the planet against the brightening sky. On the morning of June 19, Venus is occulted (hidden) by the waning crescent Moon.

Mars emerges above the east-southeast horizon after 2:00 a.m. At dawn, the Red Planet stands about degrees high in the southeast. On June 13, at the end of the night and at dawn, the last quarter Moon shines 4 degrees to the lower left of Mars.

Jupiter is visible low in the southeast after midnight. At the crack of dawn, the bright Giant Planet culminates about 23 degrees high in the south. Note the presence of Saturn, a few degrees to its lower left. On the morning of June 9, the waning gibbous Moon drawn a wide triangle with Saturn (above) and Jupiter (a bit farther to the right).

Saturn is visible very low in the southeast after midnight, a few degrees to the lower left of bright Jupiter. At the crack of dawn, Saturn culminates about 24 degrees high in the south, just to the left of Jupiter. On the morning of June 9, the waning gibbous Moon drawn a wide triangle with Saturn (above) and Jupiter (a bit farther to the right).

Add this

Share this page