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  • May 2, 2022

Planets visible to the naked eye - May 2, 2022

  • Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan
Photo: Marc Jobin
Planets visible to the naked eye

Here's a look at the planets that will be observable with the naked eye in the coming days. Follow these guidelines to find out where and when to look for them.

From May 2 to 16, 2022

Mercury undergoes an excellent evening apparition until May 10. Using a pair of binoculars, look for a small dot of light in the colours of sunset, low in the west-northwest, 30 minutes after sundown. Mercury’s brightness gradually decreases throughout this apparition, becoming harder to see after May 3 and simply too faint after May 10. The planet will appear near the Pleiades from April 27 to May 2; the thin crescent Moon joins the scene on the evening of May 2.

Venus is the dazzling Morning Star that appears in the southeast one hour before sunrise and remains visible through dawn. It shines about 8 degrees above the horizon at the start of civil twilight. Jupiter shines to its right, and the gap between the two bright planets is increasing from day to day. On May 27, the thin waning crescent Moon hangs less than 3 derees to the lower left of Venus.

Mars is visible at dawn. The Red Planet can be seen in the east-southeast 90 minutes before sunrise, between bright Jupiter, to its lower left, and Saturn, to its right. The gap between Mars and jupiter is closing rapidly: The two planets will be in conjunction on May 29. The waning crescent Moon rests to the lower left of Jupiter and Mars on the morning of May 25.

Jupiter is now easily visible at dawn. Look for the bright Giant Planet one hour before sunrise, low in the east, to the upper right of dazzling Venus; the gap between the two bright planets is increasing from day to day. Mars, located a few degrees to the upper right of Jupiter, is doing the opposite: the Red Planet is rapidly approaching the Giant Planet, and they will be in conjunction on May 29. On the morning of May 25, the thin waning crescent Moon will hang to the lower left of Jupiter and Mars.

Saturn is visible in the morning sky, at the end of the night and at dawn. The Ringed Planet appears in the east-southeast 2½ hours before sunrise; at dawn, we find it about 20 degrees above the southeastern horizon. On the morning of May 22, the last quarter Moon shines 5 degrees below Saturn.

See also

Monthly Sky

The Pocket Planetarium

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